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Luminux Takes Flight!

Click on this YouTube video link to check out the Fayetteville Airport Luminux installation.

As the chief creative director at Jancik Arts, I get asked questions about Luminux all the time, from designers to clients to friends who are interested in the product and its many uses. Recently, I was asked how it felt to be awarded the Art in Public Spaces creation of the large ceiling sculpture that now graces the Fayetteville Regional Airport in North Carolina.


First, having never before entered a nationwide Art in Public Spaces competition, I felt it was an opportunity to advance my creative spirit and illustrate to the professional design community another versatile use of our intriguing new product called Luminux.

If you’ve just discovered our website and our amazing new product, Luminux is made from highly-polished aluminum that’s both lightweight and easy to install. Each sheet, with its mirror finish and graphic print, can be cut to any size and shape and can be rolled into a soft curve, if desired. As the product is 90 percent lighter than breakable glass, it also enables us to effectively add luminosity, shimmer, and depth to all interior and commercial spaces, including walls, ceilings, framed art, and light fixtures.


The uniqueness, scalability, and ease of installation of our product is the reason we were awarded the Art in Public Spaces creation of our design, Migrate, for the Fayetteville Regional Airport. To say we were excited to receive this prestigious award, out of the 20 entries from all over the United States, would be an understatement, especially since it was the first time we submitted an entry for any Art in Public Spaces award.


The requirements of the competition dictated that the artwork be contemporary and was to weigh no more than 200 pounds total. We met that criteria with innovative problem-solving, which drove the design direction. We realized that our new product, Luminux, was the perfect solution.


Upon learning that we were chosen to create the sculpture for the airport, our minds started churning. What’s our inspiration for this project? And then it became almost obvious. That the art was to be placed in an airport called for representation of flight; thus, Migrate (birds in flight) was born. Next, to work out the scale, placement of each bird, and the method of suspension, we created a small-scale model of the design, which proved to be an important tool during the actual installation.

After working out the “small” details, it was time to get down to business! Migrate consists of 83 three foot by four foot mirrorlike aluminum panels, designed with a swirling graphic print, to add to the motion of the bird sculptures. The triangle shapes were arranged to represent contemporary avian (of, relating to, or derived from birds, if you haven’t already guessed) in flight, swooping above and around the 50-foot-diameter airport rotunda ceiling. Suspended from the 28-foot-high steel trusses, these abstract birds seem to take flight in a gentle motion that’s initiated by the interior currents.


I didn’t expect the installation, including setup, to be so simple, but we completed it in less than a day and a half, which proved to be the simplest of all Jancik Arts global installations to date.

I’ve seen Luminux panels grace many interior spaces, and each time, I’m amazed at how it has transformed those spaces into unique art creations. With Migrate, when I stand in the vast airport rotunda and look up at our first in motion installation, I’m awestruck by the shimmering birds, gently taking flight with the slightest of air movement. To see this creation, once a small rendered model, gracing this beautiful public space, is so inspiring to me, and I feel as though I have accomplished my purpose and goal well. That the artwork is accessible to the general public, especially to those who do not frequent art galleries or museums, is most meaningful, as art on any scale should be experienced by everyone. I hope all who pass through the airport rotunda experience the same awe I felt when I first witnessed Migrate, with its spinning colors and buoyancy of the birds in flight.


I could not have done this project without the help of my amazing Jancik Arts team of artists, craftspeople, fabricators, and installers. They helped to make Migrate a reality, and I can’t thank them enough!

Jancik Arts International global installations include large-scale architectural art metal and art glass that can be seen in Walt Disney World, The Church of Latter-day Saints temples, Princess Cruises, Cunard Cruise Liners, and other commercial settings, including prestigious hotels, restaurants, and luxury apartment homes.







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